Risography

For those of you who wonder about how I made the artwork for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’, I’m reposting something I posted a while back over @pictureaday_artists. If you like picture books and art, do check out this account, as an international artist takes over each week. This week it’s @phoebe.swan with her lovely, bold artwork. She just published her debut book as well, with a very important message. #repost @pictureaday_artists・・・Where all the magic happens. The risograph machine looks like an ordinary copy machine but it uses a similar principle as screen printing, where ink is pushed through little holes. But it’s a lot quicker and cleaner, once you have figured out how to prepare your layers and which settings you want to use. On the wall the very blue image in the middle is mine and the one with the chair and ladder (swipe for a close up). You might also recognise work made by @melissa.castrillon, @hwillustrator and @signeit. I don’t know who made the other prints . If you do, let me know in a comment below and I’ll include their names in this post. (I do know the top one in the left now, it’s by @doodleyboo and hanging upside down apparently)Layers for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (published by @andersenpress) have been made with the risograph machine, but as colours are so limited, we chose to select our own colours and have them printed in exact Pantone colours (rather than the usual CMYK). I love this extra care that went into the production of the book, it’s details like this that can make a big difference. #risography #printmaking @cambridgeschoolofart @csacbi #printmakingstudio #evaeland #whensadnesscomestocall
For more images, see the original post on Instagram.
Where all the magic happens. The risograph machine looks like an ordinary copy machine but it uses a similar principle as screen printing, where ink is pushed through little holes. But it’s a lot quicker and cleaner, once you have figured out how to prepare your layers and which settings you want to use.
On the wall the very blue image in the middle is mine and the one with the chair and ladder (swipe for a close up). You might also recognise work made by @melissa.castrillon, @hwillustrator@doodleyboo  and @signeit.
Layers for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (published by @andersenpress) have been made with the risograph machine, but as colours are so limited, we (art director Beccy Garrill, editor Libby Hamilton and me) chose to select our own colours and have them printed in exact Pantone colours (rather than the usual CMYK). I love this extra care that went into the production of the book, it’s details like this that can make a big difference.

Who are you?

See the original post on Instagram.

Hello old and new followers. Who are you? How did you find me? Do we know each other? I’d love to know, if you have a minute, drop me a line below… ⠀

I’m trying to make/keep social media an interesting and meaningful place for myself and those that follow me. If there is anything you’d like me to post about, let me know…⠀

This is a drawing from a project called Creativity & me. I finished it early 2018 for my degree show at the Children’s Book Illustration course at the Cambridge School of Art. It’s about the joys and perils of the creative process. It’s one of those projects that is difficult to place, as it isn’t really a children’s book, so I put it away for the time being…⠀

Endpapers

See the original Instagram for all sketches.

These are details from the endpapers from ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’. Some of the people are based on observational drawings of strangers, others are drawn from imagination.
I felt strangely relieved to have the sad people from the front endpapers do happy things on the back endpapers, as I didn’t like the idea of sad people being stuck in the book. Swipe to see some of those original sketches as well.
I wanted to include different kinds of sadness and also adults, to show children how anyone might be feeling sad, occasionally. Also grownups.
I also played with the idea of giving each person a sadness character of their own – to emphasise how it’s a personal feeling and how we all deal with it in different ways – but eventually, I decided against it and only used the one sadness shape I had developed.
By this point I was also running out of steam I think and didn’t feel like channelling even more sadness, as I felt plenty of sadness in and around me already.

If your sadness was a character, how would it look? And what would it be doing? I will tell you, it’s very therapeutic to have a sadness character of your own, as you can let it do some nice things and even get it to smile occasionally 🙂 If you or your children decide to draw your own sadness, could you share it with me or use #drawyourownsadness if you decide to post it?

‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on 3d January).

How would you draw sadness?

How would you draw sadness? Here are some early explorations of my Sadness character, when I thought that I needed to make it look more ‘original’. Hairy creatures passed the revenue. Too human figures. Too sad and dark figures. And even an elephant - until I decided a sad blob was fine. It worked and did it’s job. Better than the others could. Sometimes we just have to quiet the ego (or tutors voices ) - and just be of service of the book, I think. Does anyone here have similar experiences? Where you are kind of surprised about where your work is taking you, as if you don’t have a say in the matter yourself? ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on 3d January). Pre-order link in bio....... ........ ..#whensadnesscomestocall #evaeland #picturebook #childrensbookillustration #childrensbooks #workinprogress #creativeprocess #sketchbook #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #childrensmentalhealth #letstalkaboutsadness #smallactsofselfcare #consolationandcomfort #artastherapy

For more images, see the original Instagram post.

How would you draw sadness?

Here are some early explorations of my Sadness character, when I thought that I needed to make it look more ‘original’. Hairy creatures passed the revenue. Too human figures. Too sad and dark figures. And even an elephant – until I decided a sad blob was fine. It worked and did it’s job. Better than the others could. Sometimes we just have to quiet the ego (or tutors voices 😅) – and just be of service of the book, I think.
Does anyone here have similar experiences? Where you are kind of surprised about where your work is taking you, as if you don’t have a say in the matter yourself?

Story Builder

For more images, check out the original Instagram post.

Maybe I gave a few too many options?

The children from the Children’s Forum at @discover_story were so immersed in their stories and were so enthusiastic that most of them forgot most things we discussed before about story structure. Not very different from how my creative process starts actually… They developed their own characters and interviewed each other’s to get to know them better. After which their characters had to meet in a story. They could use the images from the Story Builder to generate ideas and create compositions.
Afterwards a few got to tell their stories and together we tried to bring them back to more cohesive stories, with a beginning, middle and an end – repeating some of the suggestions we had discussed before.
I actually already have different images in my head for this game, including more backgrounds and colour for example and bringing it visually closer to more current work from myself (a little less gloomy and dark for example), but I’ll have to let this project go for a bit. It would make more sense to develop it when I have the time to either self-publish it or find a publisher, so I know within which parameters I have to work.
But at least I have a proof of concept and a better idea of what it can become. And I still feel very passionate about it as I love to facilitate creativity and storytelling, both wonderful, empowering skills to have in this day and age I think.

What makes a good story?

I am doing a workshop on storytelling tomorrow with the clever children from the Children's Forum at @discover_story , using my own Story Builder game that I am developing.⠀What makes a good story? I will explore this with the children together and will ask for their input so they can discover through their own knowledge, but it helps to have a better idea myself.⠀What do you guys think are the possible key ingredients to good stories? What are some of the best stories you know, and do you have any idea why they work?⠀⠀I really like to hear your thoughts on this, as I know there is so much collective wisdom among all of us here on Instagram. ⠀⠀⠀⠀#evaeland #storytelling #storybuilder #illustratorsofinstagram⠀#archetypalimage #workinprogress #creativeprocess #writingwithimages⠀#machildrensbookillustration #cambridgeschoolofart #kidlitart #childrensbookillustration

See the original post on Instagram.

I am doing a workshop on storytelling tomorrow with the clever children from the Children’s Forum at @discover_story , using my own Story Builder game that I am developing.⠀
What makes a good story? I will explore this with the children together and will ask for their input so they can discover through their own knowledge, but it helps to have a better idea myself.⠀
What do you guys think are the possible key ingredients to good stories? What are some of the best stories you know, and do you have any idea why they work?⠀

I really like to hear your thoughts on this, as I know there is so much collective wisdom among all of us here on Instagram. ⠀

On drawing

For me, drawing and writing have both always been very important - using them both as tools to express, revise, construct, negotiate and develop thoughts and feelings. ⠀Drawing can calm me down and writing helps me to think more clearly.⠀⠀This is one of the illustrations from the book, showing some of the few suggestions of what you can do with Sadness. As the book only has 12 spreads, I could only include a few suggestions from all the ideas I had and things I found during my research. Maybe I should find a place for all those others as well.⠀⠀Do you have a creative outlet? Does it help you to deal with difficult emotions? ⠀⠀‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.⠀⠀#WhenSadnessComesToCall #evaeland #picturebook #childrensbookillustration #childrensbooks #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #childrensmentalhealth

Read the original post on Instagram.

For me, drawing and writing have both always been very important – using them both as tools to express, revise, construct, negotiate and develop thoughts and feelings. ⠀
Drawing can calm me down and writing helps me to think more clearly.⠀

This is one of the illustrations from the book, showing some of the few suggestions of what you can do with Sadness. As the book only has 12 spreads, I could only include a few suggestions from all the ideas I had and things I found during my research. Maybe I should find a place for all those others as well.⠀

Do you have a creative outlet? Does it help you to deal with difficult emotions? ⠀

Difficult emotions

Continuation of previous posts: I realised that to be able to make something consoling and comforting, I needed to understand the ‘difficult emotions’ first, and soon found myself stuck, with Sadness. And Anger and Fear. Just to give myself a little bit of a break, I drew Happiness too. It was such a relief! ⠀⠀This is a sketch from 2016, one those early explorations of ‘difficult emotions’. It accurately describes the feeling I have of late, of feeling enthusiastic about finally getting this book out in the world - and simultaneously being held back by fear and feeling like hiding instead. ⠀⠀Do you experience the same, that the more important something feels to you, the scarier it often feels to commit to it? And for those that published book already, do you remember how it felt to have your first book coming out? Did you find it scary as well, and how did you deal with that?⠀⠀‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.⠀⠀⠀#whensadnesscomestocall

Read the original post on Instagram.

I realised that to be able to make something consoling and comforting, I needed to understand the ‘difficult emotions’ first, and soon found myself stuck, with Sadness. And Anger and Fear. Just to give myself a little bit of a break, I drew Happiness too. It was such a relief! ⠀

This is a sketch from 2016, one those early explorations of ‘difficult emotions’. It accurately describes the feeling I have of late, of feeling enthusiastic about finally getting this book out in the world – and simultaneously being held back by fear and feeling like hiding instead. ⠀

Do you experience the same, that the more important something feels to you, the scarier it often feels to commit to it?

Paradox

This drawing I made in 2014. If only we could organise and label all our desires, thoughts and feelings this neatly. Perhaps I’ll manage one day, one book at a time ⠀⠀When I wrote the proposal during my studies for the initial concept, to make a project that would address difficult emotions and also could comfort and console the reader, I foresaw many problems and pointed out the paradox of wanting to both completely allow for the difficult feelings to be, as to offer solutions and ‘contain’ them somehow. A paradox I sometimes still struggle with. How can you both accept and embrace who you are and try to improve yourself at the same time?⠀Any thoughts on this?⠀‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio. ⠀⠀#whensadnesscomestocall

Read the original post on Instagram.

This drawing I made in 2014. If only we could organise and label all our desires, thoughts and feelings this neatly. Perhaps I’ll manage one day, one book at a time 😉⠀

When I wrote the proposal during my studies for the initial concept, to make a project that would address difficult emotions and also could comfort and console the reader, I foresaw many problems and pointed out the paradox of wanting to both completely allow for the difficult feelings to be, as to offer solutions and ‘contain’ them somehow. A paradox I sometimes still struggle with. How can you both accept and embrace who you are and try to improve yourself at the same time?⠀
Any thoughts on this?

Original idea

I found back the thumbnails of the original idea for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ after many years, when I was studying the MA Children’s Book Illustration. We’d just started the Sequential Image module, led by the incredibly talented @pamsmyillustrator (who also happens to be a very good teacher). After months of drawing from observation we we’re finally ‘allowed’ to draw from imagination. In my proposal I wrote: “I want my sequential images to be about consolation, comfort and emotions” and I asked “Can I make a sequence that gives the viewer the feeling of being consoled and hugged?”.⠀⠀Do you know any books which achieve that? Do you have an idea of why that is? I’d love to know and might start a weekly review at some point of ‘sad’, cathartic and comforting books. Would anyone be interested in that?⠀⠀The image is from the title page from ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.⠀ Look out for all the co-editions as well, of which I will share more later.
Read the original post on Instagram.

I found back the thumbnails of the original idea for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ after many years, when I was studying the MA Children’s Book Illustration. We’d just started the Sequential Image module, led by the incredibly talented @pamsmyillustrator (who also happens to be a very good teacher). After months of drawing from observation we were finally ‘allowed’ to draw from imagination. In my proposal I wrote: “I want my sequential images to be about consolation, comfort and emotions” and I asked “Can I make a sequence that gives the viewer the feeling of being consoled and hugged?”.⠀

Do you know any books which achieve that? Do you have an idea of why that is?