Risography

For those of you who wonder about how I made the artwork for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’, I’m reposting something I posted a while back over @pictureaday_artists. If you like picture books and art, do check out this account, as an international artist takes over each week. This week it’s @phoebe.swan with her lovely, bold artwork. She just published her debut book as well, with a very important message. #repost @pictureaday_artists・・・Where all the magic happens. The risograph machine looks like an ordinary copy machine but it uses a similar principle as screen printing, where ink is pushed through little holes. But it’s a lot quicker and cleaner, once you have figured out how to prepare your layers and which settings you want to use. On the wall the very blue image in the middle is mine and the one with the chair and ladder (swipe for a close up). You might also recognise work made by @melissa.castrillon, @hwillustrator and @signeit. I don’t know who made the other prints . If you do, let me know in a comment below and I’ll include their names in this post. (I do know the top one in the left now, it’s by @doodleyboo and hanging upside down apparently)Layers for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (published by @andersenpress) have been made with the risograph machine, but as colours are so limited, we chose to select our own colours and have them printed in exact Pantone colours (rather than the usual CMYK). I love this extra care that went into the production of the book, it’s details like this that can make a big difference. #risography #printmaking @cambridgeschoolofart @csacbi #printmakingstudio #evaeland #whensadnesscomestocall
For more images, see the original post on Instagram.
Where all the magic happens. The risograph machine looks like an ordinary copy machine but it uses a similar principle as screen printing, where ink is pushed through little holes. But it’s a lot quicker and cleaner, once you have figured out how to prepare your layers and which settings you want to use.
On the wall the very blue image in the middle is mine and the one with the chair and ladder (swipe for a close up). You might also recognise work made by @melissa.castrillon, @hwillustrator@doodleyboo  and @signeit.
Layers for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (published by @andersenpress) have been made with the risograph machine, but as colours are so limited, we (art director Beccy Garrill, editor Libby Hamilton and me) chose to select our own colours and have them printed in exact Pantone colours (rather than the usual CMYK). I love this extra care that went into the production of the book, it’s details like this that can make a big difference.

Say hello to Sadness

Say hello to Sadness, because today is publication day of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’!

Many thanks to the wonderful team at @andersenpress, in particular Libby @libbyhamham and Beccy @bexgarrill for their superb editing – and art directing skills. It’s an understatement when I say that I couldn’t have made this book without them.

I finished this book during my study at the @cambridge_school_of_art @csacbi and developed the blueprint of it with the help of wonderful tutors (and classmates!). Only a few of them are here on Instagram but thank you for some amazing and insightful tutorials @pamsmyillustrator @kmanolessou @davidhughesinc and friends and classmates for all the support, cakes interesting conversations.

And last but not least, thanks to my family (@welcometotheprocess @aldo_eland) and @mauri.mendes for continuing support. And Mauri in particular for making sure I’m always fed, hugged and cheered on along the way!

This is an illustration from the book. I am still surprised sometimes at how much lighter the feeling of sadness becomes, when I simply accept its presence and stop resisting it, one way or the other. This is one of the experiences I’d like to share with the reader (be it a child or an adult). Maybe sadness isn’t all that scary and overwhelming when we can face it directly, with kindness and curiosity.

How do you usually cope with feelings of sadness? Can you ‘sit’ with it sometimes and just let it be? I have to confess that it’s one of the lessons I’m still learning myself.

Read the original post on Instagram for more images.