Say hello to Sadness

Say hello to Sadness, because today is publication day of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’!

Many thanks to the wonderful team at @andersenpress, in particular Libby @libbyhamham and Beccy @bexgarrill for their superb editing – and art directing skills. It’s an understatement when I say that I couldn’t have made this book without them.

I finished this book during my study at the @cambridge_school_of_art @csacbi and developed the blueprint of it with the help of wonderful tutors (and classmates!). Only a few of them are here on Instagram but thank you for some amazing and insightful tutorials @pamsmyillustrator @kmanolessou @davidhughesinc and friends and classmates for all the support, cakes interesting conversations.

And last but not least, thanks to my family (@welcometotheprocess @aldo_eland) and @mauri.mendes for continuing support. And Mauri in particular for making sure I’m always fed, hugged and cheered on along the way!

This is an illustration from the book. I am still surprised sometimes at how much lighter the feeling of sadness becomes, when I simply accept its presence and stop resisting it, one way or the other. This is one of the experiences I’d like to share with the reader (be it a child or an adult). Maybe sadness isn’t all that scary and overwhelming when we can face it directly, with kindness and curiosity.

How do you usually cope with feelings of sadness? Can you ‘sit’ with it sometimes and just let it be? I have to confess that it’s one of the lessons I’m still learning myself.

Read the original post on Instagram for more images.

Who are you?

See the original post on Instagram.

Hello old and new followers. Who are you? How did you find me? Do we know each other? I’d love to know, if you have a minute, drop me a line below… ⠀

I’m trying to make/keep social media an interesting and meaningful place for myself and those that follow me. If there is anything you’d like me to post about, let me know…⠀

This is a drawing from a project called Creativity & me. I finished it early 2018 for my degree show at the Children’s Book Illustration course at the Cambridge School of Art. It’s about the joys and perils of the creative process. It’s one of those projects that is difficult to place, as it isn’t really a children’s book, so I put it away for the time being…⠀

Endpapers

See the original Instagram for all sketches.

These are details from the endpapers from ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’. Some of the people are based on observational drawings of strangers, others are drawn from imagination.
I felt strangely relieved to have the sad people from the front endpapers do happy things on the back endpapers, as I didn’t like the idea of sad people being stuck in the book. Swipe to see some of those original sketches as well.
I wanted to include different kinds of sadness and also adults, to show children how anyone might be feeling sad, occasionally. Also grownups.
I also played with the idea of giving each person a sadness character of their own – to emphasise how it’s a personal feeling and how we all deal with it in different ways – but eventually, I decided against it and only used the one sadness shape I had developed.
By this point I was also running out of steam I think and didn’t feel like channelling even more sadness, as I felt plenty of sadness in and around me already.

If your sadness was a character, how would it look? And what would it be doing? I will tell you, it’s very therapeutic to have a sadness character of your own, as you can let it do some nice things and even get it to smile occasionally 🙂 If you or your children decide to draw your own sadness, could you share it with me or use #drawyourownsadness if you decide to post it?

‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on 3d January).

What makes a good story?

I am doing a workshop on storytelling tomorrow with the clever children from the Children's Forum at @discover_story , using my own Story Builder game that I am developing.⠀What makes a good story? I will explore this with the children together and will ask for their input so they can discover through their own knowledge, but it helps to have a better idea myself.⠀What do you guys think are the possible key ingredients to good stories? What are some of the best stories you know, and do you have any idea why they work?⠀⠀I really like to hear your thoughts on this, as I know there is so much collective wisdom among all of us here on Instagram. ⠀⠀⠀⠀#evaeland #storytelling #storybuilder #illustratorsofinstagram⠀#archetypalimage #workinprogress #creativeprocess #writingwithimages⠀#machildrensbookillustration #cambridgeschoolofart #kidlitart #childrensbookillustration

See the original post on Instagram.

I am doing a workshop on storytelling tomorrow with the clever children from the Children’s Forum at @discover_story , using my own Story Builder game that I am developing.⠀
What makes a good story? I will explore this with the children together and will ask for their input so they can discover through their own knowledge, but it helps to have a better idea myself.⠀
What do you guys think are the possible key ingredients to good stories? What are some of the best stories you know, and do you have any idea why they work?⠀

I really like to hear your thoughts on this, as I know there is so much collective wisdom among all of us here on Instagram. ⠀

On drawing

For me, drawing and writing have both always been very important - using them both as tools to express, revise, construct, negotiate and develop thoughts and feelings. ⠀Drawing can calm me down and writing helps me to think more clearly.⠀⠀This is one of the illustrations from the book, showing some of the few suggestions of what you can do with Sadness. As the book only has 12 spreads, I could only include a few suggestions from all the ideas I had and things I found during my research. Maybe I should find a place for all those others as well.⠀⠀Do you have a creative outlet? Does it help you to deal with difficult emotions? ⠀⠀‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.⠀⠀#WhenSadnessComesToCall #evaeland #picturebook #childrensbookillustration #childrensbooks #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #childrensmentalhealth

Read the original post on Instagram.

For me, drawing and writing have both always been very important – using them both as tools to express, revise, construct, negotiate and develop thoughts and feelings. ⠀
Drawing can calm me down and writing helps me to think more clearly.⠀

This is one of the illustrations from the book, showing some of the few suggestions of what you can do with Sadness. As the book only has 12 spreads, I could only include a few suggestions from all the ideas I had and things I found during my research. Maybe I should find a place for all those others as well.⠀

Do you have a creative outlet? Does it help you to deal with difficult emotions? ⠀

Original idea

I found back the thumbnails of the original idea for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ after many years, when I was studying the MA Children’s Book Illustration. We’d just started the Sequential Image module, led by the incredibly talented @pamsmyillustrator (who also happens to be a very good teacher). After months of drawing from observation we we’re finally ‘allowed’ to draw from imagination. In my proposal I wrote: “I want my sequential images to be about consolation, comfort and emotions” and I asked “Can I make a sequence that gives the viewer the feeling of being consoled and hugged?”.⠀⠀Do you know any books which achieve that? Do you have an idea of why that is? I’d love to know and might start a weekly review at some point of ‘sad’, cathartic and comforting books. Would anyone be interested in that?⠀⠀The image is from the title page from ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.⠀ Look out for all the co-editions as well, of which I will share more later.
Read the original post on Instagram.

I found back the thumbnails of the original idea for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ after many years, when I was studying the MA Children’s Book Illustration. We’d just started the Sequential Image module, led by the incredibly talented @pamsmyillustrator (who also happens to be a very good teacher). After months of drawing from observation we were finally ‘allowed’ to draw from imagination. In my proposal I wrote: “I want my sequential images to be about consolation, comfort and emotions” and I asked “Can I make a sequence that gives the viewer the feeling of being consoled and hugged?”.⠀

Do you know any books which achieve that? Do you have an idea of why that is?

Sometimes Sadness arrives unexpectedly…

Sometimes Sadness arrives unexpectedly…The idea for this book is quite old already. I have really small thumbnails and notes that I jotted down in an hour or so, dating back to 2012 - which are almost like a very (very) rough blueprint of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’. It was called something along the line of ‘An unwanted guest - a manual’. I know I still have it somewhere but I can’t find it at the moment. This is the illustration from the first spread of the book. Swipe to see the very first sketch from my sketchbook where I start exploring ‘difficult emotions’ during the Children’s Book Illustration master - it’s one of the drawings that actually made it into the book, and even though the main character changed - Sadness didn’t change that much. He just arrived and lingered around until he made his way into the book.Do you also feel like the ideas that come easily (at first) are often the best?Illustration from ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.#whensadnesscomestocall
Read the original post on Instagram.

Sometimes Sadness arrives unexpectedly…

The idea for this book is quite old already. I have really small thumbnails and notes that I jotted down in an hour or so, dating back to 2012 – which are almost like a very (very) rough blueprint of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’. It was called something along the line of ‘An unwanted guest – a manual’. I know I still have it somewhere but I can’t find it at the moment.

This is the illustration from the first spread of the book. Swipe to see the very first sketch from my sketchbook where I start exploring ‘difficult emotions’ during the Children’s Book Illustration master – it’s one of the drawings that actually made it into the book, and even though the main character changed – Sadness didn’t change that much. He just arrived and lingered around until he made his way into the book.

Do you also feel like the ideas that come easily (at first) are often the best?