Risography

For those of you who wonder about how I made the artwork for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’, I’m reposting something I posted a while back over @pictureaday_artists. If you like picture books and art, do check out this account, as an international artist takes over each week. This week it’s @phoebe.swan with her lovely, bold artwork. She just published her debut book as well, with a very important message. #repost @pictureaday_artists・・・Where all the magic happens. The risograph machine looks like an ordinary copy machine but it uses a similar principle as screen printing, where ink is pushed through little holes. But it’s a lot quicker and cleaner, once you have figured out how to prepare your layers and which settings you want to use. On the wall the very blue image in the middle is mine and the one with the chair and ladder (swipe for a close up). You might also recognise work made by @melissa.castrillon, @hwillustrator and @signeit. I don’t know who made the other prints . If you do, let me know in a comment below and I’ll include their names in this post. (I do know the top one in the left now, it’s by @doodleyboo and hanging upside down apparently)Layers for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (published by @andersenpress) have been made with the risograph machine, but as colours are so limited, we chose to select our own colours and have them printed in exact Pantone colours (rather than the usual CMYK). I love this extra care that went into the production of the book, it’s details like this that can make a big difference. #risography #printmaking @cambridgeschoolofart @csacbi #printmakingstudio #evaeland #whensadnesscomestocall
For more images, see the original post on Instagram.
Where all the magic happens. The risograph machine looks like an ordinary copy machine but it uses a similar principle as screen printing, where ink is pushed through little holes. But it’s a lot quicker and cleaner, once you have figured out how to prepare your layers and which settings you want to use.
On the wall the very blue image in the middle is mine and the one with the chair and ladder (swipe for a close up). You might also recognise work made by @melissa.castrillon, @hwillustrator@doodleyboo  and @signeit.
Layers for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (published by @andersenpress) have been made with the risograph machine, but as colours are so limited, we (art director Beccy Garrill, editor Libby Hamilton and me) chose to select our own colours and have them printed in exact Pantone colours (rather than the usual CMYK). I love this extra care that went into the production of the book, it’s details like this that can make a big difference.

Say hello to Sadness

Say hello to Sadness, because today is publication day of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’!

Many thanks to the wonderful team at @andersenpress, in particular Libby @libbyhamham and Beccy @bexgarrill for their superb editing – and art directing skills. It’s an understatement when I say that I couldn’t have made this book without them.

I finished this book during my study at the @cambridge_school_of_art @csacbi and developed the blueprint of it with the help of wonderful tutors (and classmates!). Only a few of them are here on Instagram but thank you for some amazing and insightful tutorials @pamsmyillustrator @kmanolessou @davidhughesinc and friends and classmates for all the support, cakes interesting conversations.

And last but not least, thanks to my family (@welcometotheprocess @aldo_eland) and @mauri.mendes for continuing support. And Mauri in particular for making sure I’m always fed, hugged and cheered on along the way!

This is an illustration from the book. I am still surprised sometimes at how much lighter the feeling of sadness becomes, when I simply accept its presence and stop resisting it, one way or the other. This is one of the experiences I’d like to share with the reader (be it a child or an adult). Maybe sadness isn’t all that scary and overwhelming when we can face it directly, with kindness and curiosity.

How do you usually cope with feelings of sadness? Can you ‘sit’ with it sometimes and just let it be? I have to confess that it’s one of the lessons I’m still learning myself.

Read the original post on Instagram for more images.

The importance of self-care

See the original post on Instagram.

This year I skipped writing a long list of resolutions. Instead, I wrote down some of the things I accomplished and enjoyed in 2018. It’s so easy to forget how beautiful and special life can be when we are continually focusing on what needs to be done to move forward and trying to meet whatever expectations we have set for ourselves.

These are details from the endpapers in the back of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’. They seem to sum up perfectly the sentiment I’m feeling lately. As I’m thinking about sadness and wellbeing quite often lately, it came to my attention just how important self-care is in this regard. Especially in those moments where you need it most, it might be difficult to be kind towards yourself.
For me having enough sleep seems to be the beginning, after which all else becomes easier… like being able to enjoy the good things in life, and not feeling stuck in a permanent state of feeling overwhelmed by everything.
What are the things you do to take care of yourself and recharge?

In search of good storytelling

Thank you for joining me in my quest to find out what good storytelling is. I will share a little about the workshop I did with the Children’s Forum at @discover_story next, but first I want to share all the inspiring answers from you and the children here. Swipe to read them all. P.S. I’m well aware that this question makes a lot more sense when you define the audience first or what kind of story you want to tell... but perhaps their are still some universal ‘rules’ of good storytelling? #storybuilder #storytelling #storytellinggame #evaeland #storymountain

See original post on Instagram, with all the answers from everyone.

Thank you for joining me in my quest to find out what good storytelling is. I will share a little about the workshop I did with the Children’s Forum at @discover_story next, but first I want to share all the inspiring answers from you and the children here. Swipe to read them all.
P.S. I’m well aware that this question makes a lot more sense when you define the audience first or what kind of story you want to tell… but perhaps there are still some universal ‘rules’ of good storytelling?

What makes a good story?

I am doing a workshop on storytelling tomorrow with the clever children from the Children's Forum at @discover_story , using my own Story Builder game that I am developing.⠀What makes a good story? I will explore this with the children together and will ask for their input so they can discover through their own knowledge, but it helps to have a better idea myself.⠀What do you guys think are the possible key ingredients to good stories? What are some of the best stories you know, and do you have any idea why they work?⠀⠀I really like to hear your thoughts on this, as I know there is so much collective wisdom among all of us here on Instagram. ⠀⠀⠀⠀#evaeland #storytelling #storybuilder #illustratorsofinstagram⠀#archetypalimage #workinprogress #creativeprocess #writingwithimages⠀#machildrensbookillustration #cambridgeschoolofart #kidlitart #childrensbookillustration

See the original post on Instagram.

I am doing a workshop on storytelling tomorrow with the clever children from the Children’s Forum at @discover_story , using my own Story Builder game that I am developing.⠀
What makes a good story? I will explore this with the children together and will ask for their input so they can discover through their own knowledge, but it helps to have a better idea myself.⠀
What do you guys think are the possible key ingredients to good stories? What are some of the best stories you know, and do you have any idea why they work?⠀

I really like to hear your thoughts on this, as I know there is so much collective wisdom among all of us here on Instagram. ⠀

On drawing

For me, drawing and writing have both always been very important - using them both as tools to express, revise, construct, negotiate and develop thoughts and feelings. ⠀Drawing can calm me down and writing helps me to think more clearly.⠀⠀This is one of the illustrations from the book, showing some of the few suggestions of what you can do with Sadness. As the book only has 12 spreads, I could only include a few suggestions from all the ideas I had and things I found during my research. Maybe I should find a place for all those others as well.⠀⠀Do you have a creative outlet? Does it help you to deal with difficult emotions? ⠀⠀‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.⠀⠀#WhenSadnessComesToCall #evaeland #picturebook #childrensbookillustration #childrensbooks #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #childrensmentalhealth

Read the original post on Instagram.

For me, drawing and writing have both always been very important – using them both as tools to express, revise, construct, negotiate and develop thoughts and feelings. ⠀
Drawing can calm me down and writing helps me to think more clearly.⠀

This is one of the illustrations from the book, showing some of the few suggestions of what you can do with Sadness. As the book only has 12 spreads, I could only include a few suggestions from all the ideas I had and things I found during my research. Maybe I should find a place for all those others as well.⠀

Do you have a creative outlet? Does it help you to deal with difficult emotions? ⠀

Book presentation in the Scheltema of ‘Als Verdriet op bezoek komt’, published by Leopold

Hello! After my book presentation of the Dutch edition ‘Als Verdriet op bezoek komt’ with Leopold, I had some lovely, quiet days with my family in the Netherlands. To all those who came along to the presentation I want to say thank you. Thank you for being wonderful people and wanting to share a bit of my journey and being supportive. Even though it makes me highly uncomfortable to be in the middle of the attention and have to speak in front of a group of people, I was in a room filled with lots of my favourite people and people I admire and am very fond of - which made it all a bit easier. I have discovered a new type of sadness however, which is mixed with a feeling of shortcoming,  as I only had a few minutes with everyone to have a conversation, sometimes after years of not seeing each other! Thanks to Ria, Rosanne and Manja from Leopold for being there and being a wonderful publisher and @scheltemaboekverkopers and Christiaan for being a wonderful host. I used to work at the Scheltema, a long time ago (which I forgot to mention), so it felt extra special to have my book launch there. Check my Instagram stories for some photos of the presentation.Only 1,5 month left before ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ is officially released! I’ll be sharing more about that soon. If you think you might be interested in attending a book launch in London or Cambridge you can message me your e-mail address so you get a personal invitation. ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’, @andersenpress, January 3d. Artwork from 2016: collage from a short sequence without narrative with houses and red suns, made during my study. I might try turning this into a risograph print one day. #AlsVerdrietOpBezoekKomt #uitgeverijleopold #WhenSadnessComesToCall #evaeland#picturebook #childrensbookillustration #childrensbooks #workinprogress #collage #tinyhouse #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #childrensmentalhealth #letstalkaboutsadness #smallactsofselfcare #consolationandcomfort
Read the original post on Instagram.

Hello! After my book presentation of the Dutch edition ‘Als Verdriet op bezoek komt’ with Leopold, I had some lovely, quiet days with my family in the Netherlands.

To all those who came along to the presentation, I want to say thank you. Thank you for being wonderful people and wanting to share a bit of my journey and being supportive. Even though it makes me highly uncomfortable to be in the middle of the attention and have to speak in front of a group of people, I was in a room filled with lots of my favourite people and people I admire and am very fond of – which made it all a bit easier.
I have discovered a new type of sadness, however, which is mixed with a feeling of shortcoming, as I only had a few minutes with everyone to have a conversation, sometimes after years of not seeing each other!

Thanks to Ria, Rosanne and Manja from Leopold for being there and being a wonderful publisher and @scheltemaboekverkopers and Christiaan for being a wonderful host. I used to work at the Scheltema, a long time ago (which I forgot to mention), so it felt extra special to have my book launch there.

Only 1,5 month left before ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ is officially released! I’ll be sharing more about that soon. If you think you might be interested in attending a book launch in London or Cambridge you can message me your e-mail address so you get a personal invitation. ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’, @andersenpress, January 3d.

Artwork from 2016: collage from a short sequence without narrative with houses and red suns, made during my study. I might try turning this into a risograph print one day.

Hibernation



Read the original post on Instagram.

Even though I’d love to go into hibernation and hide under the blanket – the world is still moving as fast as ever – and I have a book launch to prepare for! ⠀
If you happen to be in Amsterdam today (Friday 16th) feel free to drop by in the Scheltema (Rokin 9), and say hello and celebrate the launch of ‘Als Verdriet op bezoek komt’ with me. We are starting at 16.00 pm. All are welcome.⠀

This was one of the images from an earlier iteration of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’, that didn’t make it into the book eventually.

Original idea

I found back the thumbnails of the original idea for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ after many years, when I was studying the MA Children’s Book Illustration. We’d just started the Sequential Image module, led by the incredibly talented @pamsmyillustrator (who also happens to be a very good teacher). After months of drawing from observation we we’re finally ‘allowed’ to draw from imagination. In my proposal I wrote: “I want my sequential images to be about consolation, comfort and emotions” and I asked “Can I make a sequence that gives the viewer the feeling of being consoled and hugged?”.⠀⠀Do you know any books which achieve that? Do you have an idea of why that is? I’d love to know and might start a weekly review at some point of ‘sad’, cathartic and comforting books. Would anyone be interested in that?⠀⠀The image is from the title page from ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.⠀ Look out for all the co-editions as well, of which I will share more later.
Read the original post on Instagram.

I found back the thumbnails of the original idea for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ after many years, when I was studying the MA Children’s Book Illustration. We’d just started the Sequential Image module, led by the incredibly talented @pamsmyillustrator (who also happens to be a very good teacher). After months of drawing from observation we were finally ‘allowed’ to draw from imagination. In my proposal I wrote: “I want my sequential images to be about consolation, comfort and emotions” and I asked “Can I make a sequence that gives the viewer the feeling of being consoled and hugged?”.⠀

Do you know any books which achieve that? Do you have an idea of why that is?

Sometimes Sadness arrives unexpectedly…

Sometimes Sadness arrives unexpectedly…The idea for this book is quite old already. I have really small thumbnails and notes that I jotted down in an hour or so, dating back to 2012 - which are almost like a very (very) rough blueprint of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’. It was called something along the line of ‘An unwanted guest - a manual’. I know I still have it somewhere but I can’t find it at the moment. This is the illustration from the first spread of the book. Swipe to see the very first sketch from my sketchbook where I start exploring ‘difficult emotions’ during the Children’s Book Illustration master - it’s one of the drawings that actually made it into the book, and even though the main character changed - Sadness didn’t change that much. He just arrived and lingered around until he made his way into the book.Do you also feel like the ideas that come easily (at first) are often the best?Illustration from ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.#whensadnesscomestocall
Read the original post on Instagram.

Sometimes Sadness arrives unexpectedly…

The idea for this book is quite old already. I have really small thumbnails and notes that I jotted down in an hour or so, dating back to 2012 – which are almost like a very (very) rough blueprint of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’. It was called something along the line of ‘An unwanted guest – a manual’. I know I still have it somewhere but I can’t find it at the moment.

This is the illustration from the first spread of the book. Swipe to see the very first sketch from my sketchbook where I start exploring ‘difficult emotions’ during the Children’s Book Illustration master – it’s one of the drawings that actually made it into the book, and even though the main character changed – Sadness didn’t change that much. He just arrived and lingered around until he made his way into the book.

Do you also feel like the ideas that come easily (at first) are often the best?