Libraries

Lovely @sarahturpinillustrator found my book in the library. I love libraries. I have the most fond memories of visiting my local library as a child. I always took as many books as I could on my card. I even pretend played ‘library’ with my friend in my spare time. There have been points in my life where I have questioned why I would keep carrying books from A to B, if I didn’t even manage to read half of them. I also remember calculating as a child how many pieces of my favourite candy I could’ve bought with the fines I accumulated over time. I don’t think as a child I was really aware of how much reading enriched my life - and that actually, growing up without a TV the first 11 years of my life gave me so much more than what I missed out on. I really believed it was important to know your Sesamstreet and whatever else they all watched. #whensadnesscomestocall @andersenpress #evaeland #library #repost @sarahturpinillustrator・・・Well look what I just found in my library @evaeland
See the original post on Instagram.

Lovely @sarahturpinillustrator found my book in the library.
I love libraries. I have the fondest memories of visiting my local library as a child. I always took as many books as I could on my card. I even pretend played ‘library’ with my friend in my spare time (I’m old enough now not to care about how uncool that sounds).
There have been points in my life where I have questioned why I would keep carrying books from A to B, if I didn’t even manage to read half of them. I also remember calculating as a child how many pieces of my favourite candy I could’ve bought with the fines I accumulated over time.
I don’t think I was really aware as a child of how much reading enriched my life – and that actually, growing up without a TV the first 11 years of my life gave me so much more than what I missed out on. Though at the time, I really did believe it was important to know your Sesamstreet and whatever else they all watched.

Say hello to Sadness

Say hello to Sadness, because today is publication day of ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’!

Many thanks to the wonderful team at @andersenpress, in particular Libby @libbyhamham and Beccy @bexgarrill for their superb editing – and art directing skills. It’s an understatement when I say that I couldn’t have made this book without them.

I finished this book during my study at the @cambridge_school_of_art @csacbi and developed the blueprint of it with the help of wonderful tutors (and classmates!). Only a few of them are here on Instagram but thank you for some amazing and insightful tutorials @pamsmyillustrator @kmanolessou @davidhughesinc and friends and classmates for all the support, cakes interesting conversations.

And last but not least, thanks to my family (@welcometotheprocess @aldo_eland) and @mauri.mendes for continuing support. And Mauri in particular for making sure I’m always fed, hugged and cheered on along the way!

This is an illustration from the book. I am still surprised sometimes at how much lighter the feeling of sadness becomes, when I simply accept its presence and stop resisting it, one way or the other. This is one of the experiences I’d like to share with the reader (be it a child or an adult). Maybe sadness isn’t all that scary and overwhelming when we can face it directly, with kindness and curiosity.

How do you usually cope with feelings of sadness? Can you ‘sit’ with it sometimes and just let it be? I have to confess that it’s one of the lessons I’m still learning myself.

Read the original post on Instagram for more images.

Getting lost in books

See the original post on Instagram.

As I’m remembering what books meant for me as a child, I’m falling in love again with them. But what happened to the time where one could hide with a book for hours and get lost in them? Does anyone else here suffer from the same syndrome of wanting to read (and buy) so many books, but hardly finding the time and peace of mind to actually read them? ⠀
Which books still manage to cast this magical spell over you, where you can forget almost everything around you? ⠀

This photo is from a wall painting I came across in Porto, where we spent part of our holiday this summer.⠀

Original idea

I found back the thumbnails of the original idea for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ after many years, when I was studying the MA Children’s Book Illustration. We’d just started the Sequential Image module, led by the incredibly talented @pamsmyillustrator (who also happens to be a very good teacher). After months of drawing from observation we we’re finally ‘allowed’ to draw from imagination. In my proposal I wrote: “I want my sequential images to be about consolation, comfort and emotions” and I asked “Can I make a sequence that gives the viewer the feeling of being consoled and hugged?”.⠀⠀Do you know any books which achieve that? Do you have an idea of why that is? I’d love to know and might start a weekly review at some point of ‘sad’, cathartic and comforting books. Would anyone be interested in that?⠀⠀The image is from the title page from ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ (@AndersenPress, out on January 3d). Pre-order link in bio.⠀ Look out for all the co-editions as well, of which I will share more later.
Read the original post on Instagram.

I found back the thumbnails of the original idea for ‘When Sadness Comes to Call’ after many years, when I was studying the MA Children’s Book Illustration. We’d just started the Sequential Image module, led by the incredibly talented @pamsmyillustrator (who also happens to be a very good teacher). After months of drawing from observation we were finally ‘allowed’ to draw from imagination. In my proposal I wrote: “I want my sequential images to be about consolation, comfort and emotions” and I asked “Can I make a sequence that gives the viewer the feeling of being consoled and hugged?”.⠀

Do you know any books which achieve that? Do you have an idea of why that is?